Public Statement in Solidarity with Persons of Asian and Pacific Island Descent

Executive Committee of the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies

LogoAs leaders of the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies, we express our solidarity with and concern for persons of Asian and Pacific Islander descent in the United States and beyond, and we deplore and condemn the violence, bias, and prejudice directed at them both past and present.

Since the middle of the nineteenth century, the practice of Christianity in the United States has tragically intertwined with false claims of White supremacy and racial bias against immigrants from Asia and the Pacific Islands and their descendants. Buddhists, Christians, as well as the followers of other Asian religions in the United States have often suffered the effects of this prejudice. We reject these attitudes and actions as a fundamental violation of the values of both Jesus Christ and Shakyamuni Buddha. We denounce the repeated use of inflammatory rhetoric against persons of Asian and Pacific Islander ancestry, and we lament the ways in which this has poisoned the atmosphere of public and social discourse in the United States. We express our solidarity and compassion for all those affected by bias and violence, especially those impacted by the shootings in Atlanta, Georgia, on March 16, 2021, and in particular those who lost family members who were murdered in acts of sexualized, gendered violence.

Buddhist-Christian Perspectives on Contemplative Practices and Religious Belonging

ConferenceThis year the annual conference of the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies will be held online. The announcement page and link to register may be found here. The sessions will be recorded and will be available for viewing afterward. The event will also be live streamed on the YouTube channel of the Berkley Center Georgetown University.

Buddhist Responses to Religious Diversity

Buddhist ResponsesBuddhist Responses to Religious Diversity
Theravāda and Tibetan Perspectives

Douglas Duckworth, Abraham Vélez de Cea,  Elizabeth J. Harris (eds.)

Buddhist Responses to Religious Diversity approaches these questions and others from perspectives representing Theravādin and Tibetan traditions of Buddhism.

Buddhist attitudes toward other religious traditions (and its own) are unquestionably diverse, and have undergone changes throughout historical eras and geographic spaces, as Buddhists, and traditions Buddhists have encountered, continue to change (after all, all conditioned things are impermanent). The present time is a particularly dynamic moment to take stock of Buddhist attitudes toward religious others, as Buddhist identities are being renegotiated in unprecedented ways in our increasingly globalized age.

Together in Hope - An Interfaith Encounter in Response to COVID-19

togetherThe Irish School of Ecumenics at the School of Religion in Trinity College Dublin in collaboration with the Dublin City Interfaith Forum invites you, whether you belong to a particular faith community or not, to join us in this short reflective encounter. Together in Hope is a joint reflection by a wide range of spiritual practitioners and compiled by Rev. Swami Purnananda.

Spiritual Resources of Retreat for Corona Times

LectureMartin Rötting gave a short basic religious studies overview of how religions and spiritual resources created for retreat can help in Corona times for forced retreat to deal with the situation. This lecture is not purly academic but ment to help using existing experience of religions and apply it to this situation. This lecture was given on March 15th 2020 for some of Martin Röttings courses at the University of Salzburg.

Meditation in Buddhist-Christian Encounter: A Critical Analysis

Bookedited by Elizabeth Harris and John O’Grady

In the last fifty years, Buddhists and Christians have come together in inter-monastic exchange, joint meditation retreats, dialogues concerning the relationship between meditation and social action, cross-tradition pupil/teacher relationships and joint academic explorations into the parallels between Buddhist and Christian spiritual practice. The practice of meditation has been important in all of these encounters and has become one of the most significant ‘grounds for meeting’ within contemporary Buddhist-Christian relationships. This book critically analyses the role in Buddhist-Christian encounter of the variety of practices embraced by the term ‘meditation’.